A dance delight

 Red Shoes image

The Red Shoes, Marlowe Theatre

I think I have discovered a new disease. It’s highly contagious, and can spread like wild fire. I’m calling it Matthew Bourne Fever, and my office came down with an almost universal case of it last week. As regular readers will know, I work in a theatre – and myself and my colleagues have fairly diverse tastes, but Matthew Bourne and his New Adventures company will get almost all of us excited.

I myself first caught this particular ailment when I saw The Car Man (see here), but now Sir Matthew is back, with a new work, an all-dance adaptation of the Powell & Pressburger film, The Red Shoes.  It’s described by the man himself as a ‘love letter’ to dance and theatre, the whole production is wonderfully and appropriately theatrical. The set in particular, is a thing of wonder. It’s most notable feature is a huge false proscenium arch, covered in gold leaf, with red velvet curtains. This turns and pivots, taking us from the front of stage to backstage to great effect.

Although I’ve started with the sheer wonder that is the set, of course, the production would be nothing without its human heart, its dancers. As ever, with Matthew Bourne, both the dancing and the acting within it are beautiful, especially from the central trio. Sam Archer is the charismatic puppet-master Lermontov, for whom dance is supreme, and human emotions are a distraction from art. In the performance I saw, the role of Vicky Page was played by the luminous Cordelia Braithwaite, with a wide-eyed delight at the start, shading into melancholy and later desperation in the second act. The third side of this triangle is Chris Trenfield, as Julian, the nerdy but adorable composer, who suddenly explodes into charisma as he conducts his own work.

The other thing about this production is that it’s often very funny – you don’t necessarily expect to laugh out loud at a dance production, but you do with this one – whether at the dancers of the Lermontov company walking through rehearsals with fags in their mouths, or the very funny sand dance in the music hall section in the second act.

I did wonder in advance whether the theme of a woman forced to choose between life and art would still feel relevant, but in the end that doesn’t really matter. This is still a thrilling human story, beautifully danced. My heart was in my mouth as Vicky’s story reached its tragic end.  If you can, go and lose yourself in this beautiful production.

The Red Shoes is touring to various venues: http://new-adventures.net/the-red-shoes

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s