Not burning

 

Antony and cleo photo
Josette Simon and Antony Byrne in Antony & Cleopatra. Photo by Helen Maybanks, (c)RSC

 

Antony & Cleopatra, Royal Shakespeare Company live from Stratford Upon Avon

It’s rare that a production – especially a production of Shakespeare – leaves me feeling just a bit ‘meh’, but that was the case with this one.  I’m aware that’s not the most eloquent response, but it’s the best I can do for this production, which is a shame as it’s not without it’s good points.

Let’s be positive and start with one of those good points. Antony Byrne is one of the actors I’ve really enjoyed watching at the RSC over the last few years (I especially loved him as Kent alongside Antony Sher’s Lear) and it’s good to see him get a proper lead role.  As I’d expected, he does a good job as the noble old soldier, with a nicely nuanced but still passionate performance.

Josette Simon is a magnificient actor (the way she howls after the death of Antony was heart-rending) – but I found it hard to warm to her Cleopatra. Indeed, near the beginning, I found her more than a little irritating. In the pre-show interviews, Simon spoke about Cleopatra as being one of the great politicians of her age, but I didn’t get that from her performance. Her Cleopatra seemed to be a woman detached from reality, playing at being queen. Fascinating, perhaps, but not evidence of a great political brain.  But amazing performance, even if I wasn’t sure about the interpretation.

I also liked Ben Allen’s Octavius – austere with nice touches of the sociopathic, and clearly a man better suited to the times than poor old Antony. But for me, the acting honours of the night went to Andrew Woodall’s Enobarbus, the great cynic and observer, who still despairs of the way his friend Antony has fallen from grace. I’ve never noticed before, but he really does get a lot of the best lines: Not only “Age cannot wither her…” but the beautiful speech describing Cleopatra and Antony’s first meeting: “The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne, burned on the water…”

But, good performances aside, this production really didn’t do it for me. Perhaps it was too reverential, too conventional.  The togas and Egyptian robes felt a bit too much like an undergraduate Ancient Civilisation-themed fancy dress party, and the pillared set was pleasant but dull. There were also some odd characterisations. Was the Soothsayer really meant to look and sound like Neil from The Young Ones? I presume not, but that’s all I could see from the moment he opened his mouth.

Much has been made of the fact that the music for this production has been composed by former chart-troubler Laura Mvula. How was her music? It was…fine. I liked quite a lot of it, I found some of it a bit intrusive. But it didn’t add a great deal, it didn’t give the production the extra dimension it lacked. 

A couple of wobbles and a few odd camera angles from the usually flawless Live From Stratford team didn’t help, but, in the end, this production felt like less than the sum of its parts. For me, it just didn’t catch fire.

https://www.rsc.org.uk/antony-and-cleopatra/

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