It’s a helluva show

on the town

Sometimes you just get the theatre you need. This seems to be particularly true of my relationship with the Open Air Theatre in Regent’s Park.  Last year, days after the EU referendum I saw Henry V starring Michelle Terry there – a nuanced piece which spoke of the complex relationships both with Europe and between the different parts of the UK. This time, after the horrible events in Manchester I got the slice of pure theatrical joy which is On The Town – the all-singing, all-dancing tale of three sailors and the three women they encounter – and the mayhem they create – during 24 hours shore leave in 1940s New York.

In the spirit of sisterhood, let’s start with the girls – especially as they’re all good performances. Siena Kelly is a sweet and beautifully danced Ivy, torn between making something of herself and a youthful desire to have fun now; Miriam-Teak Lee has a gorgeous, operatic voice and great comic timing as Claire; but my personal favourite was Lizzy Connolly’s sassy and sexy Hildy. It struck me how sexually liberated these women were, for a piece which comes from the time in which it’s set. I’m not sure whether a piece written now would feature a a character like Hildy, gleefully pouncing on a man she’s never met before and inviting him to (to quote one song title) ‘Come Up To My Place’, without later punishing her or giving her deep-seated psychological problems as background.  Progress? Hmm.

The girls are well-matched by their men.  Most of the attention in the press has focused on Hollyoaks and Strictly Come Dancing alumnus Danny Mac, in the role of Gabey (played by Gene Kelly in the film), and very good he is too – his Gabey is utterly charming and, of course, he dances like a dream.  Samuel Edwards is very funny as Ozzie – his duet with Claire ‘Carried Away’ was one of my favourite moments of the show – and Jacob Maynard brings a nicely wide-eyed quality to Chip, the small-town boy in the big city for the first time. A particular tip of the hat to Maynard, who stepped up from the ensemble after one of the original leads broke his foot.

on the town 2

This group of triple threats are supported by a great ensemble, and a great cast in the minor roles, especially Maggie Steed proving she can still shake her tail feather as Madame Dilly. The set, with its multiple levels and staircases does a good job of bringing New York to this most English of settings.

There is sometime a certain amount of snobbery about the musical, especially ‘classic’, non-edgy ones like this, but you cannot beat the pure joy they create (and that’s without considering the amount of hard work involved in them, especially on a very hot day in Regent’s Park).

The Broadway original of this was staged – and set – during the war but there’s little evidence of it. There are references to past heroism of Gabe, and presumably Hildy is driving a cab because so many men are absent, but war is very distant from this sunlit and celebratory show. One of its songs describes New York as ‘a helluva town’: this is a helluva show. If you feel like you need some joy in your life, go see it.

On The Town runs until 1st July at the Open Air Theatre, Regent’s Park https://openairtheatre.com/production/on-the-town

 

 

 

 

 

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